Police Decision-Making

When on vacation in New Delhi, India, in December, I felt devastated by a heartrending story of violence against a young woman. There were protests on the streets for several days, and every page of every newspaper focused on a need to reflect on a range of issues connected to public safety.

As one chunk of my dissertation related to public safety in general, and the Stanford Police Department in particular, I felt motivated to share some reflections on different ways of thinking about police decision-making. The first one was published in The Hindu on Dec 28, 2012, and titled, “Lessons in Policing, from a University,” and focused on the values of the Stanford Police Department. The second one looked at ways of starting locally-funded small neighborhood police departments through values-driven entrepreneurship, and was carried by the Business Standard on Jan 31, 2013, and titled “Policing in PPP Mode.” PPP refers to “public-private-partnership.”

I believe that a holistic values-driven decision-making approach can make a dent in tackling major social problems of our time, and am deeply inspired by such an approach taken by the Stanford Police Department. For those who’d like to read more about them, you can access the third chapter in Decision Analysis dissertation, titled “Achieving Clarity on Value.”

Thoughts, reflections?

The Stanford police department is an example of how law enforcement can be both non-adversarial and effective

The Stanford police department is an example of how law enforcement can be both non-adversarial and effective

businessStandardPolicingInPPPMode

Two models offer possible solutions to the endemic problem of India’s poor and inefficient police services